Heisman Trophy Race

2016 Heisman Trophy: What Will The Results Be? How Will The Vote Go?

Who’s Going To Win The 2016 Heisman Trophy?


Who’s going to win the 2016 Heisman Trophy? Will it be the Lamar Jackson Invitational? Here’s the best guess on how the vote will go and what the results will be.


Contact @PeteFiutak

Lamar Jackson, Baker Mayfield, Jabrill Peppers, Deshaun Watson and Dede Westbrook are the 2016 Heisman Trophy finalists, but who’s going to win it? More interestingly, what’s the pecking order going to be?

To be clear, this isn’t my Heisman ballot – under penalty of death, or worse, I’m not allowed to reveal this until after the official announcement on Saturday night. Also, this is mainly speculation based on talks to several friends in the business, but it’s an educated guess.

What will the results be? How will the vote go?

If you want to flip around 2-through-5 in any order, you’re probably not wrong, and go ahead and throw your own darts on 6-through-10. But again, here’s my guess.

Projected 2016 Heisman Trophy Also-Receiving Votes

10. QB J.T. Barrett, Jr. Ohio State

Ohio State quarterbacks never get enough love in the Heisman race, but Barrett should garner just enough third-place votes to show up on the list. He’s a starting quarterback for a playoff team – that might be enough.

9. DE Jonathan Allen, Sr. Alabama

Jalen Hurts will get his share of votes, but the guy who cleaned up the defensive award circuit will get the honor of being seen as Alabama’s signature star. Someone from the No. 1 team in the country will be in the top ten.

8. QB Jake Browning, Soph. Washington

Only Toledo’s Logan Woodside (43) threw for more touchdown passes than Browning’s 42, but this will purely be a regional vote for some. He might not be on any ballots outside of the Pac-12 voting area.

7. RB Dalvin Cook, Jr. Florida State

Cook should be the biggest unknown in the pecking order. He was sensational enough on a national stage to get plenty of respect in the Best Player Theory of the Heisman, but there wasn’t enough there to get too close to the top five – maybe. Even though he wasn’t the best running back in America this season, consider it a toss-up between him and …

6. RB D’Onta Foreman, Jr. Texas

Donnel Pumphrey might get a few votes as a 2,018-yard runner, but Foreman led the nation with 2,028 yards playing in just 11 games. While the Oklahoma battery or Mayfield-to-Westbrook is in New York, Foreman might have been the Big 12’s best player. Unfortunately, he rocked for a bad team that’s not even going bowling – there weren’t any real WOW moments on a national stage.

2016 Heisman Trophy Finalists

5. WR Dede Westbrook, Sr. Oklahoma

There’s a segment of the world stumping for East Carolina’s Zay Jones as the nation’s top receiver – he caught 158 passes for 1,756 yards and eight scores – but Westbrook was more dynamic and more of a gamebreaker. However, he’ll likely not get a whole slew of top two votes.

4. LB Jabrill Peppers, Jr. Michigan

While he’s a phenomenal all-around player, he’s more hype than Heisman production – the Wolverine line was the true star of the dominant D. But he was one of the nation’s best players as a factor in all three phases, and being a playmaker on defense helped the voting cause.

3. QB Deshaun Watson, Jr. Clemson

The 15 interceptions hurt his cause, and he suffered from being in the same division as Lamar Jackson, but he got his team to the ACC championship and College Football Playoff – none of the other Heisman finalists can say that. More sensational than he got credit for – he didn’t run as much as he did last season – but again, he got the job done in an MVP sort of way.

2. QB Baker Mayfield, Jr. Oklahoma

The nation’s most efficient passer, Mayfield ripped it up in the Big 12. On the year, he hit 72% of his passes with 38 touchdowns and eight picks, with a ten-mile-wide gap between him and the nation’s second-most efficient passer, Toledo’s Logan Woodside. While he struggled against Ohio State, he was terrific in the loss to Houston – it wasn’t his fault.

1. QB Lamar Jackson, Soph. Louisville

There doesn’t seem to be too much of a question about this, mostly because he’s the only guy who’ll probably be on everyone’s ballot in some way.

He might not get everyone’s No. 1 spot, but he’ll almost certainly be No. 2. Ask 20 different Heisman voters, and you’ll probably get 20 different combinations of others on the ballot.

While he didn’t close with a bang, and it hurt that Louisville limped across the finish line – everyone saw the Houston game – the 2016 Heisman race probably ended on September 17th when he roared against Florida State.